Tuesday, April 4, 2017

QUICK TAKE REVIEW By Beverly Creasey COYOTE UGLY



Bruce Graham’s harrowing prison drama, COYOTE ON A FENCE, is getting a stirring, in depth outing at Hub Theatre Company (through April 15th). Fringe companies of late have been stepping up their game with superior production values and admirable performances. COYOTE is a passionate example.

Director Daniel Bourque’s crisp production hits all the angles Graham intended it to, making the case for and against capital punishment without the cut and dried examples we’re familiar with… and Bourque’s rendering makes you notice the animal argument as well: Should that coyote have been tortured for poaching chickens? (I’ve seen the play before and that didn’t stay with me from last time.)

Statistics prove that the death penalty does not deter crime, it doesn’t save the state money, it executes innocents and in the case of diminished capacity (currently before the Supreme Court), it may constitute extreme cruelty… Yet the United States persists in doling out “an eye for an eye” justice (disproportionately applying the death penalty to African-American males), with Texas in the lead.

When Graham wrote COYOTE twenty years ago, he had no way of knowing that the character who murders worshipers at an African-American church would resonate so profoundly with the current white supremacist who, “to start a race war,” gunned down African-American members of a Bible study group. Relatives of the slain parishioners offered him forgiveness. Could we do the same?

Complicating matters, for me anyway, is that Cameron Gosselin even looks a little like the real killer, which kept me from viewing the argument in the abstract. I count myself politically opposed to the death penalty and yet, in the real world, I would be hard pressed to plead his case. Gosselin delivers a tour de force as the Aryan assassin who, because of his naïveté, elicits our pity, believe it or not.

In the cell next to his is an intelligent but arrogant prison-community organizer (Mark Krawczyk in a bravura performance) who advises inmates on appeals and who isn’t much interested in helping the new guy on the block. His journey is ours, thanks to Graham’s clever manipulation. The playwright even manages to slip exposition by us with the addition of a compassionate newspaper reporter (Robert Orzalli, radiating integrity). Bourque cagily suggests growing trust by gradually turning their chairs to face one another.

Regine Vital, however, dominates the play with the plum role of the tough talking guard who protests that the electrocutions she witnesses “don’t bother [me] at all.” Vital nails the unspoken vulnerability of someone whose impartiality has been pierced by humanity. It shines right through her dialogue.

Bravo, to the whole cast, especially the actors portraying the murderers. I imagine it’s a heavy burden, one I wouldn’t want on my back… or in my mouth. It isn’t an easy play to sit through, either (although there is some much appreciated humor). I guess that’s the point: if it’s hard to sit though, imagine what it’s like to live through.

Monday, March 27, 2017

QUICK TAKE REVIEW By Beverly Creasey Pick of the Litter



Douglas Carter Beane doesn’t often miss with his savagely funny scriptsand Take Your Pick Productions, the newest fringe company on the block, gets high marks for emerging with a smart, savvy production of THE LITTLE DOG LAUGHED (barking through April 8th).

The beauty of Beane’s script is that the gist of the cheeky “Hollywood” story is told by all four characters, often in soliloquy. That means the point of view keeps shifting so your allegiances keep changing. I, for one, couldn’t get enough of the monologues, they’re executed so deliciously.

Beane manipulates us with riotous dialogue as he sends up shallow actors, self-serving agents and our trenchant, Puritanical sexual mores. It’s a great ride. What’s more, director Cassandra Lovering knows how to cut through the sardonic humor to find the vulnerability beneath the bravado. Case in point is Aina Adler’s brilliant performance as the tough cookie whose unguarded eyes disclose depths of pain. Matthew Fagerberg, likewise, allows us to see the sensitivity at the heart of his hustling call boy.

Victor L. Shopov turns in a nifty performance as the actor who just may have a soul. Best of all is Audrey Lynn Sylvia as the fast talking, conniving, controlling agent who knows how to push everyone’s buttons. Marc Ewart’s set is thoroughly ingenious, transforming on a dime, as is Dierdre Benson’s hip sound design… and Mikey DiLoreto’s costumes are as delightful (especially for the women) as they are functional (especially for the priceless speed strip for the men!) This old dog laughed and laughed to see such sport!

Monday, March 13, 2017

QUICK TAKE REVIEW By Beverly Creasey A Star is Re-Born



How are we going to find out about women in science? Certainly not from textbooks. When Watson and Crick received the Nobel Prize for their work on DNA, no one mentioned Rosalind Franklin but without her work, the genetic code could not have been cracked. Thank heavens there’s a play about Franklin. And bless the Flat Earth Theatre for their splendid production of SILENT/SKY (playing through March 25th) about the Harvard Observatory women who singlehandedly mapped the skies.

Bet you’ve never heard of Henrietta Leavitt! Without her groundbreaking method of measuring distances in space (based on time and the brightness of pulsing stars) astronomers like Edwin Powell Hubble would never have been able to discover the existence of other galaxies or formulate the famous “Hubble Constant” (about the ratio between a distant galaxy and the rate at which it’s receding from us).

You, no doubt, recognize the Hubble name from the giant orbiting space telescope launched in 1990. Imagine my surprise, when I turned to my trusty, dog-eared copy of Webster’s New World Encyclopedia for the correct spelling of Hubble … and found that Hubble is credited for Leavitt’s work with Cepheid variable stars! (Why am I not surprised!)

If you want the real storyand a first rate play, to bootyou must see Lauren Gunderson’s lovely SILENT/SKY which chronicles three actual female “computers” (i.e. star counters) at Harvardand the appealing back story Gunderson imagines for them. Her dialogue is smart-as-a-whip and plenty witty, viewing these turn of the century women with a twenty-first century eye!

If Gunderson’s name seems familiar, you may have seen Theatre On Fire’s crackerjack production of her EXIT PURSUED BY A BEAR a couple of seasons ago. Boy, can she write! There you sit, learning intricate scientific theories without even feeling the pinchbecause the story and the characters are so damned compelling.

Director Dori A. Robinson’s production is just as compelling, with (dare I say) a star turn from Erin Eva Butcher as the unsatisfied Ph.D. mathematician relegated to repetitious star counting. Leavitt left Wisconsin for Cambridge so she could view the sky through the Observatory telescope. She is thwarted from the get-go by an officious male supervisor (Marcus Hunter in a nifty “transformation” role) and by her two co-counters who see little value in a confrontation with Harvard’s male establishment.

Annie Cannon’s resolve is softened as the play progresses (Cassandra Meyer as the tough scientist/suffragette) while Juliet Bowler as the Scottish Williamina Fleming provides gentle comic relief. Leavitt’s supportive but disapproving sister (a charming Brenna Sweet) is the playwright’s invention, as is Hunter’s smitten supervisor, both conjured to provide contrast to Leavitt’s cloistered observatory life.

See it for the remarkable script or the superb Flat Earth production: This is what a fringe company can do with good material and a boatload of passion!

Wednesday, March 8, 2017

QUICK TAKE REVIEW By Beverly Creasey From Soup to Nuts



Heidi Schreck’s GRAND CONCOURSE (playing @ SpeakEasy Stage through April 1st) makes you think of Grand Central Station but it’s actually a soup kitchen where lost souls in transit can hear a kind word, enjoy a hearty bowl of soup and move onto the next shelter or their next crisis. It’s also a mecca where some come to find solace, even redemption through the act of volunteering.

The kitchen is run by a take charge nun (Melinda Lopez in a solid performance) who is having a crisis of faith herself, wondering if one bowl of sustenance can really make a difference to the needy people she serves. Sometimes, to her surprise, a volunteer (Ally Dawson in an intense performance) may need more help than the homeless.

Director Bridget Kathleen O’Leary’s lovely, lyrical production is full of sweet humor, from the cheeky young caretaker/handyman (Alejandro Simoes at his most charming) who isn’t sure he’s ready to marry his sweetheart just yetand from Thomas Derrah in a tour de force as a delightful, down-on-his-luck, bi-polar regular who, despite being forbidden to, sneaks in to the church at night to sleep in the sanctuary.

These four characters collide, with extremely serious consequences that, curiously, don’t develop dramatically until the very end of the play, leaving us to wonder what will happen to these desperate people. We can only guess… which makes the piece a series of painterly vignettes not unlike Elmer Rice’s slice-of-life STREET SCENE.

Forgiveness is a theme, as is sacrifice, as is the church itself, whose (metaphorical) cracked, damaged stained glass windows tower over Jenna McFarland Lord’s spiffy, spacious kitchen. I left the play, reminded of the fact that most downtown historical (Protestant) churches allow the homeless to sleep in their outside entryways but not inside their buildings. (This is because they’re afraid of the damage strangers might wreak on the plumbing and religious artifacts they hold so dear. Really? Could they not employ a caretaker to watch over a few beds in their basements?)

I left with other questions, too, about what forgiveness is, for example: what it can and can’t do. Schreck sure knows how to get an audience thinking.

Tuesday, February 28, 2017

QUICK TAKE REVIEW By Beverly Creasey The Perilous Fight



Ike Holter’s edgy, passionate script, ironically called EXIT STRATEGY, is exactly the type of play Zeitgeist Stage can sink its creative teeth into. Some of director David Miller’s best work has been in plays which center around students in crisis. (I’m remembering his sensitive staging of SPRING AWAKENING and his powerful take on PUNK ROCK).

Holter wrote EXIT STRATEGY two years ago to focus attention on the unsound and unsafe state of our inner city schoolsbut the play couldn’t be more timely, now that Betsy DeVos has been confirmed as Secretary of Education. It’s quite clear that Mr. Trump, instead of the old presidential promise of “a chicken in every pot,” has installed a fox in every henhouse.

EXIT STRATEGY (playing through March 11th) grabs hold of the audience with its characters’ quirky rhythms and truncated, staccato dialogue. Their fragmented speech anticipates the looming disintegration of their schooland their lives. They’re barely coping, without enough books or computers or time… barely functioning, certainly not concentrating on learning when they all know in their hearts what’s coming: The school will be closed to save money, if not today, then at the end of the year, and the money saved will be funneled into “better” schools in “better” neighborhoods, for students who are already advantaged.

Miller has a first rate cast: Maureen Adduci and Robert Bonotto are sublime as the older, battle worn teachers. Bonotto, especially, breaks your heart with a poignant revelation. Holter invents several heartrending moments that we don’t see coming, one of which has Johnny Quinones’ name on it.

The playwright gives Matthew Fagerberg’s character quite a journey, too, from toeing the management line to joining the opposition. Fagerberg gives a bold, compelling performance. Victoria George, as well, gives a wry performance as the teacher with the patience of Job, sweetly deferring to the mania around her.

What a cast Miller has assembled! Lillian Gomes is simply delightful as the excitable English teacher: The stage lights up when she enters. (And she rocks Elizabeth Cole Sheehan’s gorgeous costumes!) Jalani Dottin-Coye, too, is quite a find. He gives a tour de force as the smart-as-a-whip student who galvanizes the faculty and inspires righteous resistance. He’s funny. He’s charismatic. He’s a presence.

Thursday, February 9, 2017

NOT SO QUICK TAKE REVIEW By Beverly Creasey Revolution at New Rep



The New Repertory Theatre’s splendid BRECHT ON BRECHT (playing through March 5th) was chosen well before the election. Director Jim Petosa ironically remarked that they thought it would be a small jab in the eye of the new, ceiling shattering administration. Irony, mother’s milk to Bertholt Brecht! Instead the show rivals the sobering surrealism we’re encountering daily.

Brecht revolutionized modern theater with his stark subject matter… and by departing from traditional dramatic strictures: No more sitting in the dark. No more complacency. No identifying with sympathetic or idealistic characters. He staged the consequences of, say, a botched Navy Seal raid. He would put the bloody, mangled bodies of Yemeni innocents center stage, just so we’d recoil. Here is the cruelty of the real world, he would say. No more pretending. No more lovely fantasies. Lights on. Get ready to squirm.

Oh, he fantasized (with the aid of a defiant, dissonant, sneering score from Kurt Weill for The Threepenny Opera) but they were Pirate Jenny’s revenge fantasies, of a ship with eight sails and fifty canons opening fire. Petosa stages her song for the New Rep production with Jenny (the wonderful Christine Hamel) looking down over the crowd she would obliterate if she could, for treating her so badly. And Petosa gets even more traction by transforming Hamel into the actual figurehead on the bowsprit of the deadly vessel!

George Tabori’s sampler of writings and songs brought me immediately back to the heyday of the American Repertory Theater under the helm of Robert Brustein, when they staged production after production of Büchner and Brecht which dispatched us stunned, horrified and converted (Brecht the socialist would have been so pleased) into the night.

In The Theatre of Revolt, Brustein’s breathtaking analysis of “Modern theater from Ibsen to Genet,” he deftly analyzes the duality in Brecht’s writing about the evil man heaps upon his fellow man. Is it in man’s very nature or the evils of society that cause such mayhem? Brustein maintains that Brecht doesn’t answer the question. “His point,” Brustein elegantly posits, “is that the world must be changed; his counterpoint is that the world will always be the same.”

Tabori’s selections for this “savage” revue include a chilling musing from Brecht’s late writings inspired by Eastern religions. “Buddha’s Parable of the Burning House” embraces Brecht’s affinity for the nothingness of the “void,” as the inhabitants of a house burn because they refuse to leave; as well as the sardonic “optimism” of the gentlemen in “Of Poor B. B.” who say “Things will improve,” to which Brecht adds “And I don’t ask when.”

A number of Brecht’s collaborations are represented in the piece, especially with Weill, which the talented troupe nimbly embraces. Yet another of Brecht’s disorienting devices (borrowed from the Berlin cabarets) is to deliver searing lyrics as if they were a lullaby, then suddenly shock the audience into submission. Music director Matthew Stern (who is wheeled out trussed up like a faceless René Magritte portrait) plays cascades of lovely, melodic notes which descend underneath the most lethal of lyrics in The Threepenny Opera, sung by Mack the Knife.

The incomparable Brad Daniel Peloquin recounts Mackie’s lurid adventures in the softest, sweetest of tones until Stern manufactures pure violence out of the piano, jolting us out of our seats with a crash bang. Then they return to Peloquin’s dulcet tenor and gorgeous accompaniment to finish the aria. (Somewhere-somewhere Brecht is smiling. If smiling is allowed. If there is a somewhere.)

The cast march gleefully in formation for the sardonic “Let’s all go barmy. We love the army.” Of course those rifles will be pointed at us. Carla Martinez and Hamel illustrate masochistic womankind for us, refusing well-to-do suitors in favor of more exciting heels with an arrogant, cynical “Sorry.” Then Martinez rages and rhapsodizes about the “rat” she can’t stop loving in “Surabaya Johnny.” Jake Murphy as the soldier and Martinez as “the mouse” sing about fleeting happiness “in the room where we play house.” They all sing “Show me the way to the next whisky bar,” perhaps next to “Moritat,” the most familiar song in the show (to rockers, that is), thanks to Jim Morrison and the Doors.

Perhaps the most memorable (and most frightening) quote of the performance is “Although we stood up and stopped the bastard, the bitch that bore him is in heat again.” I don’t know about the rest of my audience but my heart was dragging on the ground. Thank heavens they ended on a hopeful note, with that old, fantastic Spanish moon!



* My only quibble (and it’s very, very small) is that the works from which the scenes and songs were chosen were not identified in the program…And Ryan Bates’ backdrop full of wide, watching eyes were not identified either. I think one eye belonged to Richard Wagner? And one to Man Ray. Jim Pitosa kindly told me the startling close-up is the chanteuse, Brissai, and that Genet got into the act but who were the other famous eyes? I would love to know. A small, small matter indeed.

Monday, February 6, 2017

QUICK TAKE REVIEW By Beverly Creasey Full Tilt Ayckbourn



If you saw the Huntington’s delicious production of Alan Ayckbourn’s BEDROOM FARCE, then you know he’s a master of contemporary comedy (with over eighty plays in his resume) and a witty wordsmith in the tradition of Oscar Wilde. (Just about everyone I know marks THE NORMAN CONQUESTS their favorite.)

The old Lyric Stage Company on Charles Street introduced Boston to Ayckbourn’s brand of physical comedy over thirty years ago, producing many of his farces, among them a smashing version (or should I say versions) of his INTIMATE EXCHANGES (which have over sixteen permutations.) Happily, it has resurfaced this month at the Nora Theatre in Central Square.

The current, spiffy production (playing through Feb. 12th) is directed by Olivia D’Ambrosio. It’s a slow starter but once the machine gets momentum, it works like gangbusters. Mind you, you have to have a taste for British farce… and it always takes an audience ten minutes or so to acclimate to the English accents and the rhythms of farce. As they say, tragedy is easy. Comedy is hard. It has to be just light enough and just fast enough to explode in the vicinity of your hypothalamus.

Acykbourn’s conceit (and he always has one) is that two actors play four people, exiting just as their alternate character arrives, barely missing their alter ego, as it were. The Nora production adds audience participation (not to worry) to the mix in that we vote at intermission for one of two possible endings.

Sarah Elizabeth Bedard and Jade Ziane portray an unhappy husband and wife, their cheeky gardener and an overexcited teenager who flirts shamelessly with the willing grounds keeper. The wife, too, is tempted by the attentive gardener who then falls head over heels for her, annoying the teenager no end… while the husband drowns his career troubles in whisky, hardly aware of the Sturm and Drang swirling about him.

The physical comedy is superb (the relentless hiccups being my favorite), the double entendres are hilarious and the character delineations are spot on. Changing character is easier for an actress because she has wigs to help out. An actor must change his looks with his wits (and in this case, a mustache). I don’t know how Ziane managed it, but his eyebrows remained in the usual place as the gardener but leapt downward, knitting together like the top of an inverted triangle as the disapproving husband, practically meeting in his semi-scowl. He hardly needed that mustache! His monologue on “the ten reasons why one is driven to drink” is reason alone to see the play.

Bedard as the headmaster’s neglected wife, too, handles the twin states of exasperation and confusion like a seasoned comedienne. Both actors covey their characters, to a large extent, through their vocal pitch and I couldn’t keep from noticing that Bedard in wife mode sounds exactly like Debra Wise, the co-founder of The Central Square Theatre, something I found fascinating but not particularly germane to the production. Suffice it to say, if you like Ayckbourn, do take in this little gem.